Gueuze


Nowadays, Lambic on draught is hard to find. Only in a few pubs in and around Brussels you still can taste the curious sherry-like flavoured beer. Nevertheless, since 1880, Lambic was bottled to simplify transport but also for conservation properties. This method was the birth of Gueuze: Before the bottling of the Gueuze, a blend is made of 2/3 young Lambic and 1/3 old Lambic. The right ratio young/old is depending on the maturation degree (end attenuation) of each of them. The bottles, with the wild-spontaneous yeast flora, are refermented in the cellar (Method Champenoise).

After 6 months the Gueuze obtains a golden color and a cidery, winey palate; reminiscent, perhaps, of dry vermouth with a more complex and natural flavour.

It is often served as an happy hour drink in Brussels. It is the traditional beer for carbonade, as well as a beautifully based beverage with seafood or other salty meals. It's also delicious with cream sauces.

Beside the traditional Gueuze (the Gueuze Grand Cru "Cuvée René"), there is also a more commercial Gueuze that dominate the market. It is filtered, pasteurized and has a more sweet taste.

Geuze: Serve cold at 2-3 degrees Celsius.

Geuze Cuvée René: Serve cold at 5 degrees Celsius.

                              StudioEmma